How to include a HOT-INFUSION PRACTICE in your Pathology Prevention plans. 

   Pharmacopoeias once included extensive entries for decoctions, or ‘Hot-Infusions’. They eventually fell out of favor, as they were considered inconvenient. In fact, one of the most common mainstream criticisms of herbal medicine is that it is inconvenient. To the Health Guardian, however; therapeutic benefit outweighs convenience! From a different perspective, it might also be argued that the time and attention required to make a decoction provides a stress-relieving therapeutic benefit not offered by any pill.

   Decoctions Or ‘Hot-infusions’ are liquid preparations made by boiling vegetable (woody) substances with water. A general formula for decoctions is provided here. Decoctions must be freshly made, and when their strength is not otherwise directed, they are to be prepared by the following general formula: Place the drug in a suitable vessel provided with a cover, pour upon it 2 cups of cold water, cover and boil for fifteen minutes. Cool to about 100°F, express, strain the expressed liquid, and pass enough cold water through the strainer to make the product measure 2 cups.